Hazelnut brown nectar


imageWe got back into brewing by making Rogue’s hazelnut brown nectar ale. The five gallons of goodness was kegged on Saturday. We can’t wait to try it. It smells delicious.
One bad thing was I didn’t have any grain bags to put in my pot so I had to strain everything with cheese cloth. I have since been to get a couple of brewing bags so I can avoid this next time. We do all grain brewing which is cheaper and makes me feel more in control and more in touch with the whole imageprocess.

Make Your Own Hard Cider

cidergroupAre you buying six packs of cider at the store and want to save money and make your own unique product to share? You can brew your own hard cider at home with a couple of ingredients. Let’s get started.

You Need

One 1-gallon carboy with airlock or 1-gallon plastic jug with screw cap.

Enough half-gallon glass “growler” jugs or other bottles (including caps or corks) to store the finished cider. I use only plastic to bottle because of potential explosions.🙂 I keep my finished cider in the plastic jug or carboy and drink it from there or I pour into smaller plastic bottles to store.

Hard Cider Ingredients

  • 1 gallon of preservative-free, sweet apple cider, preferably unpasteurized.
  • Optional one packet of wine or cider yeast (Lalvin 71B or Red Star Cote des Blancs are good choices)
  • Optional for sparkling cider:3/4 cup honey or brown sugar

cider strainYou need to start out with cider either purchased or homemade or half and half which is what I do.

If you’re buying sweet cider, start by checking the label to be sure the cider doesn’t contain chemical preservatives, because these will kill your yeast and your cider will not ferment. (The cider is chemically preserved if sodium benzoate or potassium sorbate are listed on the label.) Buy cider in season from a local orchard or natural grocer.

Also, be aware that most commercial cidermakers are required to pasteurize their cider, and the process they use will affect the flavor. Preferably, your sweet cider should be “cold pasteurized,” which kills microorganisms with ultraviolet light but will leave enough natural ingredients so you can still use the juice.

A variety of dry and liquid brewing yeasts will work for making cider but I prefer the wild fermentation method because it’s easier and free. It can be more unpredictable and if you want to control the whole process you should likely buy yeast to use. If you buy a package of cider yeast from a homebrew store MAKE SURE TO READ THE DIRECTIONS. Usually add 1/6 of the packet since you are only making a gallon.

Pour out ½ the cider directly into a one-gallon glass carboy. Or empty half the jug of apple juice and replace with 1/2 of fresh squeezed apple juice. The amounts can vary but I usually add about half a gallon that i juice. If you don’t have a juicer you can cook the apples in water, cool and puree in a blender too. If the cider is chunky it’s not bad. You will strain it before bottling.

Place your carboy/jug in a room where the temperature is 60 to 75 degrees. Stay within this range so the fermentation doesn’t go too fast or too slow.

Within a day or two you should see the airlock start to bubble. The gas it’s releasing is carbon dioxide, a byproduct of the fermentation process.  This bubbling should subside within a week or more and that will be the end of the primary fermentation. After that, let the cider sit another week to allow the yeast to settle out.

Rack the Cider to remove the bottom yeast. If you want to bottle the cider immediately, affix the rinsed food-grade tubing to the spigot on your fermentation bucket and pour the cider off into a sanitized plastic jugs or plastic bottles leaving the yeast and fruit sludge at the bottom and discard.  You can also filter it with cheese cloth and a funnel.

Let the bottled hard cider sit for another two weeks and then it will be ready to drink. Your cider will probably be “still” (i.e., not fizzy) unless you let it age for several months. Hard cider is more like wine than beer, and the flavor will improve as it ages.

Make it Sparkle. To make the cider sparkling before bottling it first bring 1 cup of water with 3/4 cup honey or brown sugar to a boil. Pour this mixture into a sanitized jug/ bucket. Then, siphon your cider into it. Then, bottle as you would normally. You’ll have to let this sit a bit longer than the still cider, so the residual yeast will have time to ferment the sugar you added and carbonate the cider inside the bottle.

Drink Up!

Making Apple Chips

I saw a bag of apple chips that had pecans on them and they were $5 for a small bag. With a dehydrator I figured I could make them. And yes you can. They taste like apple pie too.

We have a lot of apples that I get from trees, the food bank or actually buy them. I have also been known to take apples but mostly from trees that are abandoned and conveniently on the sides of roads.

So I first peeled the apples and sliced them into rings like I do if I am going to dehydrate them plain.sliced apples

Next, you dip them in ground pecans or hazelnuts mixed with cinnamon and brown sugar. I mixed this in the food processor and didn’t measure it. I did use one bag of pecans. The mixture sticks to the wet apples.

Place them on the dehydrator trays and turn the dehydrator on. I didn’t time it but I think they went about 10 hours. You can check them during the process to see if they are crunchy or not. Once they are done stick them in ziploc bags and enjoy!

dip applesapple chips in

New Etsy Herbal Products

These are the last of the herbal etsy products for awhile minus one more set of teas I will list. I am focusing on making yarn and buttons and jewelry as well as a mystery food product which I am excited to start. I will however be doing tutorials on how to make herbal produnew etsy productscts and things to use and eat for healthy living.The tinctures I am combining for ailments like headaches and allergies.


Using Rosehips

ImageFresh rose hips contain a lot of vitamin C, so they share many uses with vitamin C including preventing and treating coldsflu, and vitamin C deficiencies. However, much of the vitamin C in rose hips is destroyed during drying and processing.

Rose hips are also used for stomach disorders including stomach spasms, stomach acid deficiency, preventing stomach irritation and ulcers, and as a “stomach tonic” for intestinal diseases. They are also used for diarrheaconstipation,gallstonesgallbladder ailments, lower urinary tract and kidney disorders, fluid retention (dropsy or edema), gout, back and leg pain (sciatica), diabeteshigh cholesterolweight losshigh blood pressure, chest ailments, fever, increasing immune function during exhaustion, increasing blood flow in the limbs, increasing urine flow and quenching thirst.

Frost is said to sweeten the rosehips a bit though they are full of seeds and not a fruit you want to pop into your mouth. My boyfriend tried one and they are not so tasty. I used them in jam before doing anything else with them. They have a lovely pink shade.

You can also use rosehips as a tincture which is preserving them in alcohol basically. To me this seems like a good idea because you aren’t heat treating the rosehips or cooking the nutrients out of them. Fill a mason jar 3/4 of the way full and then add vodka (preferably 100 proof). Let it sit for 3 weeks and then bottle.

You can also purchase rosehips but the only reason I use them is because they are a native find for me to use for free.