Using Rosehips

ImageFresh rose hips contain a lot of vitamin C, so they share many uses with vitamin C including preventing and treating coldsflu, and vitamin C deficiencies. However, much of the vitamin C in rose hips is destroyed during drying and processing.

Rose hips are also used for stomach disorders including stomach spasms, stomach acid deficiency, preventing stomach irritation and ulcers, and as a “stomach tonic” for intestinal diseases. They are also used for diarrheaconstipation,gallstonesgallbladder ailments, lower urinary tract and kidney disorders, fluid retention (dropsy or edema), gout, back and leg pain (sciatica), diabeteshigh cholesterolweight losshigh blood pressure, chest ailments, fever, increasing immune function during exhaustion, increasing blood flow in the limbs, increasing urine flow and quenching thirst.

Frost is said to sweeten the rosehips a bit though they are full of seeds and not a fruit you want to pop into your mouth. My boyfriend tried one and they are not so tasty. I used them in jam before doing anything else with them. They have a lovely pink shade.

You can also use rosehips as a tincture which is preserving them in alcohol basically. To me this seems like a good idea because you aren’t heat treating the rosehips or cooking the nutrients out of them. Fill a mason jar 3/4 of the way full and then add vodka (preferably 100 proof). Let it sit for 3 weeks and then bottle.

You can also purchase rosehips but the only reason I use them is because they are a native find for me to use for free.

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